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Secondary Stalls

Introduction:

  • This stall is called a secondary stall since it may occur after a recovery from a preceding stall
  • Performing the secondary stall procedure demonstrate the effects of improper control usage inducing another stalla fter initiating a recovery from the initial stall

Secondary Stalls:

  • Secondary stalls are caused by attempting to hasten the completion of a stall recovery before the airplane has regained sufficient flying speed
    • It also occurs when the pilot fails to reduce the angle of attack sufficiently during stall recovery by not lowering pitch attitude sufficiently, or by attempting to break the stall by using power only
  • When this stall occurs, the back-elevator pressure should again be released just as in a normal stall recovery
  • When sufficient airspeed has been regained, the airplane can then be returned to straight-and-level flight

Stall Avoidance

  • Avoid flying at minimum airspeeds
  • Remain in the normal flight envelope
  • Avoid abrupt maneuvers
Airplane Flying Handbook, Figure 4-7. Secondary Stall
Airplane Flying Handbook, Secondary Stall
Airplane Flying Handbook, Figure 4-7. Secondary Stall
Airplane Flying Handbook, Secondary Stall

Secondary Stalls Procedure:

WARNING:
All procedures here are GENERALIZED for learning.
Fly the maneuver in accordance with the Pilot Operating Handbook (POH)
and/or current Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)


  1. Select an altitude where recovery will occur no lower than 1500' AGL
  2. Perform clearing turns
  3. Perform a power-off stall or power-on stall as directed
  4. At the stall, call out, "stalling," and reduce the angle of attack to regain control effectiveness
  5. Add full power to regain airspeed
  6. Maintain coordinated use of the ailerons and rudder to level the wings and prevent entering into a spin
  7. Immediately increase the pitch attitude to induce another (secondary) stall
  8. At the stall, callout, "stalling," reduce the angle of attack to regain control effectiveness
  9. Add full power to regain airspeed
  10. Maintain coordinated use of the ailerons and rudder to level the wings and prevent entering into a spin
  11. Adjust pitch to the Vx attitude, re-trimming as necessary and minimizing altitude loss
  12. With a positive rate of climb established:
    • As airspeed increases, raise the flaps in increments, to 10 °:
      • Too abrupt of flap retraction will result in a dramatic loss of lift and possibly stall
    • As airspeed increases, but below VLO raise the landing gear
    • At or above Vx retract flaps to 0°
  13. Complete cruise checklist, returning to the altitude, heading, and airspeed required

Secondary Stalls Airman Certification Standards:

Conclusion:

  • It is important to note that individual aircraft may have stall characteristics unique to them due to bends/twists which develop in the airframe over time depending on their use

References: